Displaying items by tag: FuelNumberland engineering consultancy for new processes, new materials. New processes: We analyse, optimize and document processes often not covered by quality management handbooks and teach them to run. We translate technical demands into physical effects or properties and then find the suitable material.http://www.materials-broker.de/index.php/offers/itemlist/tag/Fuel2016-07-22T20:34:56+02:00Joomla! - Open Source Content ManagementBetter membranes for fuel cells2015-10-27T21:11:56+01:002015-10-27T21:11:56+01:00http://www.materials-broker.de/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1514-better-membranes-for-fuel-cellsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.materials-broker.de/media/k2/items/cache/f5a5c719a0f9b80a2e6100f134c631b9_S.jpg" alt="Better membranes for fuel cells" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Better membranes for fuel cells</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-10</p> <p>A gas cellular can produce electrical energy through a chemical reaction between a gas and oxygen. Those that use a proton-conducting polymer membrane as the electrolyte are known as proton exchange membrane (PEM) gas cells. These are semipermeable membranes generally made from ionomers and created to carry out protons while being impermeable to gases. Nevertheless, until now, PEM fuel cells have actually unsuccessful mostly because of mechanical failure of the membrane. To increase their durability and life time, a new project had been founded. One of the absolute most common and commercially available PEM materials is the fluoropolymer perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA). The project made great strides in obtaining low equivalent-weight (EW) PFSA ionomers with improved mechanical properties contrasted to the state of the art. Benchmark ionomers may have been hitherto the best materials in the lab. Nevertheless, the task proved that they were not the best in terms of durability when membrane layer electrode assemblies (MEAs) were assessed after 100 hours of continuous procedure. To this end, experts utilized reduced EW ionomers in their bid to prepare membranes with robust mechanical properties. Their approaches relied on the usage of chemical, thermal, and processing and filler reinforcement techniques. In particular, the focus had been on checking out ionic cross-links during emulsion polymerisation and membrane layer casting. This approach leads to non-linear ionomer molecules with large molecular weight that overcome problems linked with membrane layer dimensional changes – i.e. swelling. Researchers also used electrospinning to produce organic and inorganic fibres for mechanically reinforcing the low EW standard ionomers. Through nanofibre reinforcement, scientists reported significant improvement of mechanical properties of the last membranes and greater durability, with conductivity being greater contrasted to the benchmark membrane. Another technique to mechanically strengthen the standard ionomers had been through ionic cross-linking based on nanoparticles. A number of membranes had been prepared utilizing nanoparticle fillers of different hydrophobicity. With in situ tests designed to accelerate mechanical degradation, the stabilised MEAs demonstrated improved durability, with less than 3 % voltage loss after 2 000 hours of operation.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Energy</li><li>Source</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Cell</li><li>Membrane</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.materials-broker.de/media/k2/items/cache/f5a5c719a0f9b80a2e6100f134c631b9_S.jpg" alt="Better membranes for fuel cells" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Better membranes for fuel cells</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-10</p> <p>A gas cellular can produce electrical energy through a chemical reaction between a gas and oxygen. Those that use a proton-conducting polymer membrane as the electrolyte are known as proton exchange membrane (PEM) gas cells. These are semipermeable membranes generally made from ionomers and created to carry out protons while being impermeable to gases. Nevertheless, until now, PEM fuel cells have actually unsuccessful mostly because of mechanical failure of the membrane. To increase their durability and life time, a new project had been founded. One of the absolute most common and commercially available PEM materials is the fluoropolymer perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA). The project made great strides in obtaining low equivalent-weight (EW) PFSA ionomers with improved mechanical properties contrasted to the state of the art. Benchmark ionomers may have been hitherto the best materials in the lab. Nevertheless, the task proved that they were not the best in terms of durability when membrane layer electrode assemblies (MEAs) were assessed after 100 hours of continuous procedure. To this end, experts utilized reduced EW ionomers in their bid to prepare membranes with robust mechanical properties. Their approaches relied on the usage of chemical, thermal, and processing and filler reinforcement techniques. In particular, the focus had been on checking out ionic cross-links during emulsion polymerisation and membrane layer casting. This approach leads to non-linear ionomer molecules with large molecular weight that overcome problems linked with membrane layer dimensional changes – i.e. swelling. Researchers also used electrospinning to produce organic and inorganic fibres for mechanically reinforcing the low EW standard ionomers. Through nanofibre reinforcement, scientists reported significant improvement of mechanical properties of the last membranes and greater durability, with conductivity being greater contrasted to the benchmark membrane. Another technique to mechanically strengthen the standard ionomers had been through ionic cross-linking based on nanoparticles. A number of membranes had been prepared utilizing nanoparticle fillers of different hydrophobicity. With in situ tests designed to accelerate mechanical degradation, the stabilised MEAs demonstrated improved durability, with less than 3 % voltage loss after 2 000 hours of operation.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Energy</li><li>Source</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Cell</li><li>Membrane</li><ul></div>Nano Technology against Emissions2015-10-27T22:11:25+01:002015-10-27T22:11:25+01:00http://www.materials-broker.de/index.php/get-in-contact/item/1508-nano-technology-against-emissionsAdministratorgrond@numberland.de<div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.materials-broker.de/media/k2/items/cache/0a4409fd7de9904a5f786d566e19e14d_S.jpg" alt="Nano Technology against Emissions" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano Technology against Emissions</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-04</p> <p>The usage of fossil fuels has developed a quantity of problems for which countries are intensively developing solutions to boost sustainability. All solutions require some type of separation and purification, which is currently achieved through primarily energy-intensive processes such as absorption, cryogenic separation and distillation. Polymer membranes are considered one of the absolute most energy-efficient methods for separating gases. However, many polymers either have actually low permeability or are not selective toward one gasoline over another. A project therefore developed novel polymers that effectively separate gas mixtures. The project looked at proper combinations of nanofillers with microcavities inside them that have actually well-defined size and porosity dispersed in advanced nanoporous polymers. Addition of nanofillers such as carbon nanotubes, zeolites, mesoporous oxides and metal-organic frameworks permitted increasing the polymer-free volume and creating preferential networks for mass transportation. Other than developing large amount polymers such as polynorbornenes, researchers also produced polymers of intrinsic microporosity. Such polymers are unable to pack effectively in the solid state and therefore trap enough free volume. Due to their contorted framework, they allow fast transport of tiny gas particles. Scientists developed a new polymerisation effect based on old chemistry – Tröger's base formation – that allowed them to prepare an extremely stiff polymer framework. Prospective programs of the technique should expand far beyond planning polymers just for gas separation membranes. Due to its extreme rigidity, the polymer functions as a molecular sieve, hindering transportation of larger gasoline molecules. To become an attractive alternative, pervaporation membranes need to be improved to become highly selective for ethanol over water. The task significantly improved understanding of fouling processes occurring at the membranes to enhance ethanol data recovery from fermentation broth. The project's innovative membrane layer technology should also offer an alternative to conventional processes for CO2 separation in energy stations. Despite their prospective, the polymer materials require to be scaled to enable further analysis of the separation procedure.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Emission</li><li>Fossil</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Energy</li><ul></div><div class="K2FeedImage"><img src="http://www.materials-broker.de/media/k2/items/cache/0a4409fd7de9904a5f786d566e19e14d_S.jpg" alt="Nano Technology against Emissions" /></div><div class="K2FeedIntroText"><h1><span style="display: inline; float: none; position: static; font-size: 14px; font-weight: bold; font-family: Tahoma,Arial,sans-serif; font-size-adjust: none; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 14.3px; text-align: left; text-decoration: none; text-indent: 0px; text-shadow: none; text-transform: none; word-spacing: normal;">Nano Technology against Emissions</span></h1> </div><div class="K2FeedFullText"> <p>ID: F1510-04</p> <p>The usage of fossil fuels has developed a quantity of problems for which countries are intensively developing solutions to boost sustainability. All solutions require some type of separation and purification, which is currently achieved through primarily energy-intensive processes such as absorption, cryogenic separation and distillation. Polymer membranes are considered one of the absolute most energy-efficient methods for separating gases. However, many polymers either have actually low permeability or are not selective toward one gasoline over another. A project therefore developed novel polymers that effectively separate gas mixtures. The project looked at proper combinations of nanofillers with microcavities inside them that have actually well-defined size and porosity dispersed in advanced nanoporous polymers. Addition of nanofillers such as carbon nanotubes, zeolites, mesoporous oxides and metal-organic frameworks permitted increasing the polymer-free volume and creating preferential networks for mass transportation. Other than developing large amount polymers such as polynorbornenes, researchers also produced polymers of intrinsic microporosity. Such polymers are unable to pack effectively in the solid state and therefore trap enough free volume. Due to their contorted framework, they allow fast transport of tiny gas particles. Scientists developed a new polymerisation effect based on old chemistry – Tröger's base formation – that allowed them to prepare an extremely stiff polymer framework. Prospective programs of the technique should expand far beyond planning polymers just for gas separation membranes. Due to its extreme rigidity, the polymer functions as a molecular sieve, hindering transportation of larger gasoline molecules. To become an attractive alternative, pervaporation membranes need to be improved to become highly selective for ethanol over water. The task significantly improved understanding of fouling processes occurring at the membranes to enhance ethanol data recovery from fermentation broth. The project's innovative membrane layer technology should also offer an alternative to conventional processes for CO2 separation in energy stations. Despite their prospective, the polymer materials require to be scaled to enable further analysis of the separation procedure.</p> <p><a href="mailto:getincontact@numberland.com?subject=Get%20in%20Contact">getincontact@numberland.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p></div><div class="K2FeedTags"><ul><li>Nano</li><li>Technology</li><li>Emission</li><li>Fossil</li><li>Fuel</li><li>Energy</li><ul></div>